Meet the Robots That Review Your Resume [Video]

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Hiring Managers know how an Applicant Tracking System (ATS) can help find the best candidate for a job.

Particularly in today’s robust and competitive job market, an ATS can help HR professionals reduce the burden of having to read scores of resume from candidates who simply may not be right for the role, saving hiring companies a great deal of time and money.

Job candidates and recruiters, however, may not fully understand or appreciate how an ATS works or even why they’re in use.

  • What does an ATS look for?
  • Why do some resumes pass and others don’t?
  • What can be done to tune a resume so it’s not immediately declined?

This brief video explains how many potentially qualified candidates may be screened out simply because their resume was written the old-fashioned way; for human eyes, not the discerning “robot” eyes of an ATS.

Here’s a quick, animated look at how an ATS works, why an ATS offers significant value to those in the talent acquisition field, and guidance to help candidates improve their resumes to make them robot-friendly:

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Lewis Lustman

Lewis Lustman is a content marketer who enjoys developing materials that engage, inform, challenge, and hopefully entertain my audience. Lewis is a former journalist for Los Angeles Magazine and the Los Angeles Times, and has worked for a number of leading advertising, marketing, technology, and PR firms over the years. Interested in a topic that he hasn't yet tackled? Drop him a line in the comments section!

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